VULVAR VESTIBULITIS TREATMENTS

Vulvar Vestibulitis Can Be Treated. Find the Right Treatment For You and Start Feeling Better.

Before I get into the nitty-gritty of Vulvar Vestibulitis treatments, I recommend that you read the articles: The Truth About Vulvar Vestibulitis, Causes of Vulvar Vestibulitis, and Vulvar Vestibulitis Symptoms. I am using a relatively different approach to providing treatments by breaking up Vulvar Vestibulitis into 5 different subsets. Therefore, it is important to have a good idea of what subset you fall into so that you can look into the treatments that are most likely to be effective. Note: I believe it is possible to fall into 2 subsets at once. For example, I have the symptoms of both Atrophic Vestiublodynia and Cyclic Vulvovaginitis. Think carefully about how your pain symptoms fit into the subsets.

Vulvar Vestibulitis Treatments: Atrophic Vestibulodynia The first line of defense again vulvar pain caused by Atrophic Vestibulodynia is a compound estrogen/testosterone cream. Irregularities in the estrogen/testosterone balances of the body have caused inflammation of the glands and the thinning of the vaginal skin. A compound estrogen/testosterone cream can help rebalance those levels and alleviate the symptoms. Because atrophic vestibulodynia is caused by chemicals that throw the body's hormones out of balance (oral contraceptives, chemotherapy, etc.), it's important to stop as many sources of those chemicals as possible. If you are on the pill (or any other form of hormonal birth control), stop immediately. The compound estrogen/testosterone cream will not be effective as long as this cause of hormonal imbalance is still around. Further, remove as many sources of chemicals that mimic natural hormones as possible. This includes hormones added to beef and pesticides sprayed on fruit/vegetables. Aim to eat 50% organic fruits/vegetables and only organic dairy and meats.

Vulvar Vestibulitis Treatments: Pelvic Floor Dysfunction (also known as Vaginismus) By far the most reliably effective treatment of Vaginismus is biofeedback therapy. Because vaginismus is caused by weak muscles, biofeedback therapy is a type of physical therapy that teaches women to be able to control their vaginal muscles. But not all types of biofeedback therapy are created equal: always look for a therapist that is familair with the Glazer Protocol. This protocol uses exercises that focus on controlling tension and relaxation, building stability in the muscles, and learning to control contraction of the muscles around the vagina (this helps to allow penetration during sex, etc.) and only this protocol has been shown to be effective in treating vaginismus. Another treatment built on a similar notion of muscle control is vaginal dialators. Vaginal dialators are a set of inserts that come in a variety of sizes that can be used to train the body to handle penetration without inducing muscle spasms. Relaxation techniques can be very valuable to women with Vaginismus. The best techniques involve deep breathing and visualization techniques.

Neuronal Proliferation:The most commonly used treatment for Neuronal Proliferation is tricyclic antidepressants. The point of using these for women with neuronal proliferation is that antidepressants prevent the nerve-endings from reading/interpreting signals of pain. Once the percieved pain is stopped, the body reduces the numer of nerve-endings because they are no longer necessary (remember: as much as it doesn't feel like it, your body is always on your side, trying to help you out). Care must be taken to monitor how you feel when taking such medication. There are several kinds of antidepressants with varying doses that can be prescribed; if you feel cloudy/sluggish or gain weight on a particular kind of antidepressant, let your doctor know right away so that they can adjust. Secondary Neuronal Proliferation, in which extra nerve-endings results as a form of an allergic reaction to antifungal treatments, can sometime be treated by removing the initial culprit: yeast overgrowth. For treatment of recurrent yeast infections, it is best to use Boric Acid Suppositories. These suppositories should be used twice a day for 4 months except when on period. During menses, the Boric Acid Suppositories should be used once a day. Boric Acid can sting when it leaks out of the vagina and so Vitamin A and D ointment (or petroleum jelly or olive oil) should be used as a protective barrier between the Boric Acid and inflamed skin.

Cyclic Vulvovaginitis: The best treatment for Cyclic Vulvovaginitis is Boric Acid Suppositories. Boric Acid helps regulate the vaginal flora, helping to balance the good and bad bacteria and stabalizing vaginal pH levels. Boric Acid has been used as a remedy for recurrent yeast infections for decades and has been shown to work up to 98% of the time. These suppositories should be used twice a day for 4 months except when on period. During menses, the Boric Acid Suppositories should be used once a day. As stated above, Boric Acid can sting when it leaks out of the vagina and so Vitamin A and D ointment (or petroleum jelly or olive oil) should be used as a protective barrier between the Boric Acid and inflamed skin. I also use Vitamin A and D ointment to help insert the suppositories quickly and with as little pain as possible. Additionally, I'd recommend washing the leaked out Boric Acid with warm water when at all possible to limit the amount of irritation it can cause. Another treatment for getting rid of yeast is to stop giving it what it loves (as in, needs to survive): sugar. When you have a diet full of sugar, it provides a welcoming environment for yeast in the vagina. Therefore, limit your intake of carbohydrates (bread, pasta, candy, even too much fruit).

Irritant/Allergic Contact Vaginitis: Irritant/Allergic Contact Vaginitis can be best treated by removing all possible irritants; by irritants, I mean chemicals in products that come in contact with the vulvar skin. Possible irritants include toilet paper, pads, tampons, laundry detergents, and fabric softeners. While it may be possible to zero in on the one source of irritation, many women find it easier to buy hypoallergenic, unscented, natural versions of all of these products to eliminate all possiblity to harmful chemicals. Women with Irritant/Allergic Contact Vaginitis often also have inflammed vaginal glands and thin vaginal skin due to ongoing damage. The best treatment for these symptoms is a compound estrogen/testosterone cream. This cream helps the glands to function normally which allows them to send out the proper signals thereby reducing the inflammatory response and thickening the skin.

The Vulvar Vestibulitis treatments under each subset should be used together. Women with Vulvar Vestibulitis need to take a holistic approach to their well-being; this includes watching your diet and being involved in both the intervention and prevention of pain.

Vulvar Vestibulitis can be a very confusing illness to have. Because I've spent so much time researching Vulvar Vestibulitis, I have created a newsletter to help other women make sense of it all.Before I get into the nitty-gritty of Vulvar Vestibulitis treatments, I recommend that you read the articles: The Truth About Vulvar Vestibulitis, Causes of Vulvar Vestibulitis, and Vulvar Vestibulitis Symptoms. I am using a relatively different approach to providing treatments by breaking up Vulvar Vestibulitis into 5 different subsets. Therefore, it is important to have a good idea of what subset you fall into so that you can look into the treatments that are most likely to be effective. Note: I believe it is possible to fall into 2 subsets at once. For example, I have the symptoms of both Atrophic Vestiublodynia and Cyclic Vulvovaginitis. Think carefully about how your pain symptoms fit into the subsets.

Vulvar Vestibulitis Treatments: Atrophic Vestibulodynia The first line of defense again vulvar pain caused by Atrophic Vestibulodynia is a compound estrogen/testosterone cream. Irregularities in the estrogen/testosterone balances of the body have caused inflammation of the glands and the thinning of the vaginal skin. A compound estrogen/testosterone cream can help rebalance those levels and alleviate the symptoms. Because atrophic vestibulodynia is caused by chemicals that throw the body's hormones out of balance (oral contraceptives, chemotherapy, etc.), it's important to stop as many sources of those chemicals as possible. If you are on the pill (or any other form of hormonal birth control), stop immediately. The compound estrogen/testosterone cream will not be effective as long as this cause of hormonal imbalance is still around. Further, remove as many sources of chemicals that mimic natural hormones as possible. This includes hormones added to beef and pesticides sprayed on fruit/vegetables. Aim to eat 50% organic fruits/vegetables and only organic dairy and meats.

Vulvar Vestibulitis Treatments: Pelvic Floor Dysfunction (also known as Vaginismus) By far the most reliably effective treatment of Vaginismus is biofeedback therapy. Because vaginismus is caused by weak muscles, biofeedback therapy is a type of physical therapy that teaches women to be able to control their vaginal muscles. But not all types of biofeedback therapy are created equal: always look for a therapist that is familair with the Glazer Protocol. This protocol uses exercises that focus on controlling tension and relaxation, building stability in the muscles, and learning to control contraction of the muscles around the vagina (this helps to allow penetration during sex, etc.) and only this protocol has been shown to be effective in treating vaginismus. Another treatment built on a similar notion of muscle control is vaginal dialators. Vaginal dialators are a set of inserts that come in a variety of sizes that can be used to train the body to handle penetration without inducing muscle spasms. Relaxation techniques can be very valuable to women with Vaginismus. The best techniques involve deep breathing and visualization techniques.

Neuronal Proliferation:The most commonly used treatment for Neuronal Proliferation is tricyclic antidepressants. The point of using these for women with neuronal proliferation is that antidepressants prevent the nerve-endings from reading/interpreting signals of pain. Once the percieved pain is stopped, the body reduces the numer of nerve-endings because they are no longer necessary (remember: as much as it doesn't feel like it, your body is always on your side, trying to help you out). Care must be taken to monitor how you feel when taking such medication. There are several kinds of antidepressants with varying doses that can be prescribed; if you feel cloudy/sluggish or gain weight on a particular kind of antidepressant, let your doctor know right away so that they can adjust. Secondary Neuronal Proliferation, in which extra nerve-endings results as a form of an allergic reaction to antifungal treatments, can sometime be treated by removing the initial culprit: yeast overgrowth. For treatment of recurrent yeast infections, it is best to use Boric Acid Suppositories. These suppositories should be used twice a day for 4 months except when on period. During menses, the Boric Acid Suppositories should be used once a day. Boric Acid can sting when it leaks out of the vagina and so Vitamin A and D ointment (or petroleum jelly or olive oil) should be used as a protective barrier between the Boric Acid and inflamed skin.

Cyclic Vulvovaginitis: The best treatment for Cyclic Vulvovaginitis is Boric Acid Suppositories. Boric Acid helps regulate the vaginal flora, helping to balance the good and bad bacteria and stabalizing vaginal pH levels. Boric Acid has been used as a remedy for recurrent yeast infections for decades and has been shown to work up to 98% of the time. These suppositories should be used twice a day for 4 months except when on period. During menses, the Boric Acid Suppositories should be used once a day. As stated above, Boric Acid can sting when it leaks out of the vagina and so Vitamin A and D ointment (or petroleum jelly or olive oil) should be used as a protective barrier between the Boric Acid and inflamed skin. I also use Vitamin A and D ointment to help insert the suppositories quickly and with as little pain as possible. Additionally, I'd recommend washing the leaked out Boric Acid with warm water when at all possible to limit the amount of irritation it can cause. Another treatment for getting rid of yeast is to stop giving it what it loves (as in, needs to survive): sugar. When you have a diet full of sugar, it provides a welcoming environment for yeast in the vagina. Therefore, limit your intake of carbohydrates (bread, pasta, candy, even too much fruit).

Irritant/Allergic Contact Vaginitis: Irritant/Allergic Contact Vaginitis can be best treated by removing all possible irritants; by irritants, I mean chemicals in products that come in contact with the vulvar skin. Possible irritants include toilet paper, pads, tampons, laundry detergents, and fabric softeners. While it may be possible to zero in on the one source of irritation, many women find it easier to buy hypoallergenic, unscented, natural versions of all of these products to eliminate all possiblity to harmful chemicals. Women with Irritant/Allergic Contact Vaginitis often also have inflammed vaginal glands and thin vaginal skin due to ongoing damage. The best treatment for these symptoms is a compound estrogen/testosterone cream. This cream helps the glands to function normally which allows them to send out the proper signals thereby reducing the inflammatory response and thickening the skin.

The Vulvar Vestibulitis treatments under each subset should be used together. Women with Vulvar Vestibulitis need to take a holistic approach to their well-being; this includes watching your diet and being involved in both the intervention and prevention of pain.

Vulvar Vestibulitis can be a very confusing illness to have. Because I've spent so much time researching Vulvar Vestibulitis, I have created a newsletter to help other women make sense of it all.

Comments (30)

Betty · over 6 years ago

I had ovaries removed years because of ovarian cancer. I suspect my problem is atrophic vestibulodynia. I will be trying the estrogen/testosterone cream - but are you suggesting I need to stop oral HRT as well?

Teddy · about 6 years ago

I am 63 years old, am on Estrace 1mg and Prometrium 100mg daily for about 13 years. I've tried to go off but the symptoms of mood changes, headaches etc aren't worth going off for me. Last year at this came time I developed a gum problem and along with it the burning pain of the vulva, frequency, pain in the vagina. No Doctor could figure it out. Finally after 6 months it went away. But it was awlful. I got depressed as it was so painful. Now again the same things are happening all over again and I am about to leave for India in 2 weeks and can't imagine travelling with this pain. Any suggestions? This time I also have severe chills at times only, lower back pain and get extremely fatigued by it.

Grace · about 6 years ago

Hi: I feel for everyone on this site because I had had it for six years now and have seen at least 10 doctors in all different areas of healthcare system.

I can tell you this. I don't like going the way of anti-depressants and how they make me feel. I hear you gain alot of weight on them,
and for me, I just can't get though the beginning stages. What I have found helps is a mucle relaxant called flexeril recommended for back pain, etc. Works pretty well if you stay on them, but you must take them when you get to bed, because they wipe you out. Another thing I have read about and having been doing for years now is the low-oxalate diet. I feel that if I stick to the diet, I also feel a lot better. NO TEA. 2 MAX CUPS OF COFFEE A DAY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
I also was told by my ob/gyn to wash with aveno baby oatmeal soap. The Cetafil was too irritating. So the oameal works. It comes in powder form for baby baths. I take a small amount make a paste out of it and wash with it using a shower messager. During the day if I feel irritated, I take a small empty water bottle like Poland Spring fill it with at least a taplespoon of oatmeal fill it with tap and shake the bottle until the oatmeal is no longer stuck on the bottom so you know it's mixed well. I sit on the toilet and pout it down my vulvar like a waterfall. It soothes it instantly. Not to say it's a cure, but it get you thru the day. At night I use vitamin E supposities, which after months of use every night work quite well for the dryness.
I have not been able to have sex for 6 years now but sometimes because of the daily pain I can't even think about what I am missing. I am hoping that I can come up with the money someone to see Dr.Glazer for biofeedback someday.
I hope this helps someone somewhere out there.

Please let me know if any of this helps you as well and your treatments as well. I would love to hear them.

Bestof Luck
Grace

Sandysnow · about 6 years ago

Grief this all does sound rather concerning. I have had 'the problem' for about two months now. I am 63 and started the menopause at 48. I tried hrt and was given oestrogen unopposed by a very silly doctor and had to be examined because of the error (still had uterus). Anyway, I have managed to control most of the symptoms all of these years with selenium and star flower oil, but two months ago I had an unexplained bleed. Around that time I had three or four extremely severe flashes of heat, that was enough for me to tear my sweater off (no worries, I was at home) and had a little breast tenderness. After various people looked at the problem area and poking around with instruments and scans, they were satisfied that nothing too serious was going on. So vaginal dryness seems to be the problem and I have been given vagifem and I am using a lubricant called Yes, which is extremely helpful. I don't know if I am suffering stress and that is what has brought this sudden onslaught, or maybe a detergent or, the worst scenario, my oestrogen has packed its bags and headed for the hills. I feel utterly betrayed by my body and just wonder if I am ever really going to feel normal again. Sex for me has been out of the question. There is another product on the market, but it is only available in the usa, so if anybody has tried it, please sing out. The 'Yes' is brilliant.

Annie Anxiety · almost 6 years ago

im young, 26, been dealing with this for 6 years and have gotten used to the cycle of flare up. i was just put on birth control, Necon, oral contraceptive for an ovarian cyst. i am concerned that it is causing my condition to flare up again. most literature suggests immediately ending any oral contraceptives. any advice??

Dee M · almost 6 years ago

Not sure which subset I fall under. I am 60 years old and have suffered with this for over 10 years. In my case, I have pain in only one spot. I am open to any suggestions. I have yet to find a doctor in Louisiana that has been able to help.

Lisa 74 · almost 6 years ago

I got vv 7 months ago after having surgery, i think the pain has caused my pelvic floor to go into spasm. So har i have had one pudendal nerve block which didnt work and have just been to the vulvar clinic where i have been prescribed primovate cream, is to soon to know if it is working but dosent cause any additional burning so we'll see! If this dosent work then i'll be sent for physical therapy and dilators. This has totally ruined my life before this i was able to have fantastic sex and now i just have constant pain and sex is not even an option and even with the slightest of pain i wouldnt be prepared to have sex! My heart goes out to anyone suffering from this and i thank god that there are doctors out there who have made it there work to help women like us! Good luck to everyone, i hope we can all find something that will eventually stop our pain x

Babycakes · almost 6 years ago

I just started having the symptoms of this about 6 weeks ago and im scared to death.i havent got to see my gynocologist as of yet but have an appointment.I am also going to go to a uro-gyno in july.its very painful.i already have fibromyalgia and interstitial cystitis and it makes it worse.my family doctor gave me flagyl and diflucan for 10 days,im in the middle of the doses.and its just sustaining it somewhat.i am so confused on all this and dont know where to find any of these creams and things that im seeing.all i know is i want to feel normal again.i want to be able to sit and stand without crying.please help.anyone!!!

Rainbow · almost 6 years ago

Hello, I'm 36. I have had vvs for half my life. I'm in Australia and the treatment- compound estrogen/testosterone cream has never been mentioned to me. Can anyone give me some more information. I.e; pharmaceutical companies, brand names, % of ingredients. That would be a great help.

Hamdia · over 5 years ago

HI, Im 29 years old. Got married over 2 1/2 years and ago to the most amazing man I have ever met and we had our first child last year. Since our sons birth, I have had uncomfortable sex whereas before and during pregnancy our love life was amazing... As time has gone on since my sons birth, I have gone to numerous doctors who would tell me the pain is in my head. I feel like I have been going crazy and it has put such a strain on our marriage. I feel so blessed to have such an amazing man who is staying by side through this.. I have recently found a doctor who has finally found that I had so much damage from a tear from where I had my epesiotomy going right up past my clitoris.. To help ease the pain she had recommended I use a surgical cream to help numb the scar tissue of the tear before intimacy.
This has now caused such inflammation that now I cant even let my husband near me.. I wish I could get past the pain but I dont know how.. I have been back to the doctor several times these last few months since then, as the problem is now unbearable. She has since sent off test results as she is suggesting I have something else which is beyond ridiculous. I immediately came home and researched my own symtoms and the photos of Vulvar Vestibulitis and what she is suggesting are completely different!!?? I dont have any symptoms of what she is assuming I have but definitly have every single one of the symptoms of Vulvar Vestibulitis... In my country it seems they have not even heard of Vulvar Vestibulitis and they dont believe what I am saying about it... I have even sent my doctor the link to these sites and I am still waiting to hear back from her..
What is more upsetting, is that we both had our hearts set on trying for another baby early next year. I have had 2 abnormal smear tests and am waiting to find out if my next one is clear incase I need to have laser surgery before becoming pregnant.
I dont even know how I am going to let another doctor near me with the pain that it causes.
I dont even really know how to feel... I feel devastated, angry, hurt, frustrated and so sad that my poor husband has to suffer now too..
So far, every single one of the doctors that I have being seeing will not refer me to a specialist. I guess I will just have to wait and see what these supposed tests that they have done come up with.
I know in my heart that this is what I have and I just wish that someone would listen to me instead of looking at me like Im an idiot..
I am determined to try and get through this and research further also.. And maybe even bring it the doctors attention here and teach them about it- I am only guessing that surely I am not the only woman living in New Zealand going through this??
I feel for everyone going through this and I wish none of us had to go through it at all..

Helpme · over 5 years ago

Is there someone out there that will have a phone conversation with me. I really need some help and I would be willing to pay for the call to talk, I need help from somebody now!

Freedom · over 5 years ago

I am a married 41yr. old female (childless). I have recently been diagnosed with Cystitis (bladder inflammation) and have had successful Instillation treatments for that, and am now experiencing chronic and unusual discomfort at the vestibule ( entrance) of my vagina. Any recommendations to alleviating these symptoms? Thank you so much!

Gw North · over 5 years ago

I am so happy to find this website. I am going through the articles now and hope to be posting more soon.

Lyds · over 5 years ago

Hi, I'm 28 years old. I've been suffering from the pains described since 2 weeks now. I was on the birth control pill 'Yasmine', I started having spot bleeding. I continued the pill to finish my month, but I started feeling the pains. I though I was having another yeast infection!... but I took a pill for that thinking I would feel better in the morning. A couple of weeks have passed and I'm still in pain. I can,t have sex with my boyfriend or use a tampon.

HELP... I can't imagine having this for years!!

Acb · over 5 years ago

Im 28 Ive had this on and off and back on for 7 years now. It started with a yeast infection. I saw many doctors. Finally found one that diagnosed with VVS. Im on BC for migraine control. We tried creams and ointments they worked for short times. Then we tried pills for nerve pain. They worked for the Migraines. Then I had surgery, It worked the next year I had a bartholin cyst. Had to have it removed as it abscessed. Now I have a scar that hurts all the time, and the VVS is back because I was taken off the pills for other reasons. Im very frustrated. My husband has been with me thru this whole thing we just were married last year. Any Ideas?

Leigh64 · about 5 years ago

I'd like to try the boric acid suppositories. Should I buy them from Amazon in the powder form and put them in capsules myself? Or is there somewhere else to buy them in capsule form? From reading your website, I think I have cyclic Vulvovaginitus. So far I've tried A&D ointment, vitamin E oil, and tea tree oil. Sometimes the tea tree oil helps numb the pain.

Bleu Bird · about 5 years ago

This is a great site but one thing it is missing is info about alternative treatment options. I have been struggling with VVS for over 15 years. I tried all of the traditional medical treatments available - antidepressants, boric acid and other yeast treatments, lidocaine, biofeedback & PT, injections, topical estrogen, etc. Most of these things only aggravated my inflammation. I started seeing a naturopath who had me do a food allergy test. When I cut dairy and nuts out of my diet the inflammation immediately started to get better. I'm surprised that none of the docs or websites ever mention food allergies as a possible cause / aggravation. A therapist referred me to a local acupuncturist who specializes in women's health. She was an OBGYN in China before she came to the US. I did weekly acupuncture appointments with her, and at home I did a sitz bath every other day and topical oil daily, both made from Chinese herbs. This gentle approach is the only thing I have tried that significantly reduced my inflammation. My husband and I now have two healthy boys and gave birth vaginally with midwives and no drugs. Now that I have been off the treatment for some time it seems some of the inflammation has come back, so I will start it up again soon. The downsides to this type of treatment are that it can be hard to find the right professional, it can be expensive (not covered by insurance) and time consuming. However, it is natural, pain free, free of side effects, and it works. It's worth the effort.

Vivaciousmel · about 5 years ago

Hi everyone- thank you Alex for setting up this site. It's informative and up to date. After reading people's comments, my heart goes out to you, as I've been through very similar, frustrating experiences. I struggled for 5 years, thinking sex was meant to hurt, doing rounds of doctors and specialists all telling me there was nothing wrong, and it was all in my head.

Believe me, I feel your pain and anger about being dismissed and misdiagnosed. There ARE doctors out there, who are trying their best to understand this condition, and who are very keen to explore the ins and outs. My sister, like Alex, is intending to train to be a gyny, and I know she's going to do all she can to investigate conditions like ours.

I was diagnosed with NP VVS 7 years ago, by a fantastic gyny in the UK. I am apparently a very typical case, as I was born very prematurely, have various food allergies, and have had kidney stones (no one had an explanation for that at the time, and they still don't!). It had got to the point where I couldn't sit down for very long, I couldn't do any exercise, sex and tampons were impossible, and every trip to the toilet ended in tears. Because I was in such agony at the appointment, she was so careful in examining me.

I've been a low course of amitriptiline (antidepressants) since diagnosed, and all the pain symptoms have gone away. Not everyone responds well to this, but given my experience, I would recommend trying this, if everything else hasn't worked for you. I never would have thought I would be happy to be a ADs for such a long time, but everytime I've dropped the drugs, the pain that returns is horrific, so I know now that it is just something I must live with.

I've also had counselling about my previous traumatic sex experiences. This is an ongoing process, as the whole experience and the level of constant pain, eroded my self-esteem and self-belief, and I still struggle with this. My two previous boyfriends actually dealt with the situation incredibly well and I hope any future partners will be as awesome about handling this part of me.

As for sex, I would initially use lidocaine cream before and after sex, use plenty of lubricant and make sure I peed after sex to avoid any infections etc. I know lidocaine can weaken the skin, so I didn't want to use it too often. It normally has to be prescribed here, but that may be different in other countries- I know this is the same in Australia and New Zealand.

After the first few times, if we had sex every day (or as much as possible!), things settled down and didn't cause us any problems. I appreciate this isn't conventional and that for alot of you, this just isn't even conceivable, but this worked best for me- and they certainly weren't complaining :D. I've looked over lots of websites and help forums etc, and no one had mentioned this. I've also found doing yoga has really helped re-align my pelvic muscles- which were completely tightened against the daily pain I was experiencing.

I suspect from what other people describe, I do hope you find a doctor that can help you, and understand what you are going through. The more you talk to people, you may find they have had something similar or can recommend someone to talk to.

I'm happy to talk to anyone in the UK, if they are looking for advice and good luck everyone!

La.Vie.En.Bleue · almost 5 years ago

I have suffered for 4 years and I'm 31, although, I suspect I've had the problem longer. (problem for me is notable terrible pain during intercourse) The first thing that has finally worked for me is anthistamines taken orally. I wonder if I have a food allergy, but I am still trying to figure it out. I have never read elsewhere that this works, but finally I've found SOMETHING.

Sneworld · over 4 years ago

I'm so happy to have found this website. Have been to countless Doctors and to a couple of gynos over the past year to no avail. I have been in agony with no explanation till now. Thank you! I'm going to change my diet NOW and seek out that cream. I have some hope now...

Ruby · over 4 years ago

Hi Vivaciousmel
I have read your story and im so pleased ami has worked for you. Im also in the UK and have recently been diagnosed with Vulvar Vestibulitis. I had a burning sensation 2 days after sex with my new partner I initially thought it was an std was tested and everything clear. I has a uti was given antibiotics and it cleared. 4 months later had a smear symtoms started again was given more antibiotics and the symtoms cleared in a week. 2 months later the waful burning started again after sex and hasnt gone away had awful burning and stabbing pain on the right side now for 5 weeks. I have been put on ami also started taking 10mg at night slight improvement but still there. I have just put them up to 20mg now and seen a bit more improvement. Im seeing a doctor again next week maybe he will increase me further. Reading your story makes me feel hopeful I cannot bear to be in this constantpain for the rest of my life. Sex is completely out of the question for me at the moment which is so hard as I love my partner dearly. If you like to maybe get in touch that would be fab as im also in the uk.

Hayley · over 4 years ago

I've just moved into a new area, seeing yet another doctor, having to explain the situation yet again (Zzzz). I came off the pill 5 months ago which improved things a little but I've had a couple of really bad experiences lately which has killed the sex life again. The doctor has given me amitrypilene, which I am hesitant to try because I have piled on the pounds lately anyway and am about to start training as a teacher (need to be switched on). However- I am willing to try anything. I made the decision to come off the pill myself and have been using condoms (not ideal since they make my VV worse)- the doctors I have seen were not in support of me coming off the pill - they never suggested the hormone cream route either. Has anyone been to a UK doc and just asked for this stuff? I took my first 10mg dose of amitryptilene last night and I'm very lethargic today. The doctor said that people tend to just "get over it" after a while. One thing this doctor DID tell me about is the Gynefix, which is hormone-free a coil 3 times smaller than the copper IUD which doesn't make your periods heavier and does not cause extreme menstrual cramping. I have an appointment to have one fitted (apparently not many people are trained to do this). I'm astounded that I haven't heard of it before and that it isn't more popular. Perhaps it's expensive and the NHS will only give it to people who really can't have hormones and have heavy periods? Will report back my findings- does any of this ring any bells for anyone?

Mahmee09 · over 4 years ago

I was diagnosed over thirty five years ago, long before people were talking about this condition. I have had it on and off...mostly off. Yes, the first time I was free of burning and itching was when I took estrogen cream and rubbed it on the outside. I also used Aveeno (packets for bath) and would make compresses about twenty minutes a day. I use Sony intestinal Cleanser four times a week...it cleans the colon and helps the gut. I know yeast is a problem for me. I am highly allergic to yeast medications except gyne-lotrimin which I use every second day when I get an attack. I have had this bad enough to sit in the tub and put ice cubes in my vagina...that really helped. I also know that panicking and fear are your worst enemies....try many things and something will work. I have had this and a great sex life inspite of this... acupuncture has been a miracle for me.

Fe9104 · over 4 years ago

Hi,

I am 21 and have suffered with VV since I lost my virginity 5 years ago. ALthough probably before since i couldnt even use tampons. After 4 years going from one ignorant doc to the next, i finally found one who took this condition seriously and had a treatment plan. He told me to do the estrogen cream for two months. He said if that doesnt work there is a surgery that can be done. I just started the cream and i hope that will be enough but has anyone done the surgery?? I just want to be able to have a sex life. this is starting to take a toll on my relationship.

Emc2491 · about 4 years ago

All I want to know is if anyone has ever been cured for VVS? I need some hope right now because I am absolutely hopeless.

Britters1028 · about 4 years ago

Emc2491 Hi! I found this site a couple weeks ago and was wondering if it was still in use.. Glad to see it is!! Short background: I have suffered from VVS since about 2008, and I am currently 24 years old. I hate this stupid awful condition with everything I have. I believe mine is mostly brought on by stress and diet. I have tried a lot of things to help cure it but nothing has worked so far, except this.. A friend of mine recently turned me on to Moringa because she lost 52 lbs using it. I wanted to lose my baby weight plus she told me it had like 36 different anti-inflammatories in it. Bc I am so inflamed down there I decided I had to try it. I have tried the diet, Rephresh, estrogen cream, Replens, (those 3 made it worse-especially the Replens)
Anyway, I am using Moringa now and am having success with it. I've only been using it 2 weeks, but I can already feel a difference. I actually just started selling Moringa products through a private company bc it has helped me, so if you wish to go about it that way, I would love to help you feel better!!! Please do not blow this off as I am trying to sell you something, bc I promise that's not the case! You can get Moringa elsewhere, I just don't have personal experience with the other stores/products etc. I hope this info will help you ladies kick your VVS to the curb!!! Feel free to e-mail me with questions, or to let me know if you try it and it helps you. You can get Moringa elsewhere, I just don't have personal experience with the other stores/products etc. and there are several different kinds from what I have heard and researched. Good luck ladies, feel better soon!!!!
Brittany
britters1028@yahoo.com

Elednor · almost 4 years ago

Hi, i was hoping anyone could give me some advice with how to approach the doctor about atrophic vestibulodynia, i've mentioned it, and asked if i could have my hormones checked, but she said it would be pointless and just show up as normal. If i am on the pill is this true, would they show up as normal? would i have to come off the pill for the hormones to show as unbalanced (if that is even the problem at all!)

I'm just having a hard time trying to get her to believe me. After 3 years of trying her suggestions, non of which worked, i don't know how to ask her to try my idea.

Any ideas would be greatly appreciated!
Thanks everyone :)

Babylove · almost 4 years ago

Elednor, I suggest the next time you go see the gyne, bring all your re search with you. That will help. Or go to you family doctor to get your hormones checked.. I was on the pill for 5 years, normal sex life than "bam" this happens.. if the doctor doesnt believe you I suggest get another opinion

Dh1 · over 3 years ago

Check out the VP foundation, lots of info there.

Laila91 · over 3 years ago

I have had VVS around the age of 15, im 22 now..i found out when i first got sexually active a few months ago, im from europe and my gyno is supposidly the best one in my city..she only gave me some kind of a cortisone steroid cream which i only used twice cause it HURTED me so bad its not normal. she also sent me to see a pelvic floor specialist.. i'll see how that works out, but it wont make my vulvar vestibulitis go away..my doctor is being all optimistic acting like i am exaggerating and that vvs can be treated with no problem..what a douche. I'm not even really getting the treatment i should be getting like you americans, i asked for an estrogen cream and my gyno said thats nonsense because there is already good blood circulation thats why its also looking so red and inflamed(uhmm okay?)I recently started taking birth controll pills, the first month i had 2 yeast infections that were HORRIBLE, absolutely horrible my vagina hurted bad.. and again my doctor thinks the birthcontroll hasn't got anything to do with it, but i changed my birthcontroll pills to the lowest dose, the yeast infection didnt come back(yet) but i do have a burning feeling in my vagina all the time, especially after peeing, i never had it this bad im guessing it is still the birth control causing this.Sorry i am rambling.. Back to the story.. I'm glad that i found this website im hoping i can find something to make sex less painfull..since my gyno wont give me good medicines or atleast try i'm going to try to go for the natural route, avoiding harsh chemicals while showering wearing cotton underwear, trying to do both a low oxalate and low carb diet(for the yeast).. i know eating biologic food is the best choice but its expensive.. ah well.. i'll also try to rub natural oils around my vestibule and see if i get any results. Hope all of us get cured soon.. or atleast less pain. goodluck to all of you with your vvs journeys

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